Adès: Asyla etc.

In our living room we have five shelves on the wall. Three of them are deep and filled with books. Two of them are shallow and filled with cd’s. One with classic, and one with modern music. I always feel a little overwhelmed when I look at all those cd’s, all that music. I have no idea what it all is, what I would like and what I wouldn’t like.

But I like music, and I figured one way to go through them would be as good as any, so I will do it alphabetically. Today, while baking cookies for a sleepover with a friend, I listened to a series of works composed by Thomas Adès: ‘Asyla’, ‘These Premises Are Alarmed’, ‘Chamber Symphony’ and ‘…but all shall be well’.

This is not your typical classical music. It’s dark, it kind of gives you the creeps and is nice to listen to at the same time. It makes me think of music we listened to in Art History from that period where everything went weird in art. I don’t really remember what era exactly, but it was somewhere around Bela Bartók, Stravinsky’s ‘Le Sacre du Printemps’ (which I love by the way) and the Cobra-movement. I don’t know, maybe I’m mixing everything up, but that’s where my associations brought me.

I have to say there is a three-hour gap between when I wrote the first three paragraphs and when I’m writing this line, so I kind of lost my flow. Main point: I like this cd. My kind of music.

Poem

what are we but dust and shadow
hold together by sheer will
and our hopes and our dreams

when they are gone
we shatter and fade
as we drift away on the wind

 

A poem I wrote for an art project of a friend.
Under construction.

There is freedom waiting for you,
on the breezes of the sky,
and you ask “What if I fall?”

Oh but my darling,
what if you fly?

– Erin Hanson

 

Prompts #8 – Take Me to the Moon

Every day, The Daily Post posts a prompt on their website – a situation or little idea you can use as inspiration to write. Although I didn’t like their explaination, yesterday’s prompt was take me to the moon. This is my interpretation.

“Do not swear by the moon, for she changes constantly. Then your love would also change.”
– William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet

Over time, the moon has been a mystery to mankind and a source of wonder and imagination. Very often she plays an important part in religions. Today I have for you a selection of quotes, poems and artwork inspired by the moon.

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Some Pictures

Today’s prompt didn’t really speak to me, or bring up any anecdotes worth mentioning, so I tried to come up with something else. For me, it’s a little like writing stuff for my drama class at school. I have plenty of interesting ideas, but when I need one, I can’t find any. In the end, I decided to give you some nice pictures I found on the internet.

cat_plant_potThree-legged fox planter, by Alicia Zwicewicz and Josiah Henderson. Available at their shop.

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Prompts #6 – No Cliffhangers

Every day, The Daily Post posts a prompt on their website – a situation or little idea you can use as inspiration to write. Yesterday’s prompt was no cliffhangers, and this is my interpretation.

No Cliffhangers
Write a post about the topic of your choice, in whatever style you want, but make sure to end it with “…and all was well with the world.”

Once upon a time there was a young woman. She liked her life very much. She had a nice job, she had a few very good friends, she loved her parents and she had the best of housemates: her cat Jojo. Her name was Susie.

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Prompts #2 – Worlds Colliding

Every day, The Daily Post posts a prompt on their website – a situation or little idea you can use as inspiration to write. Today’s prompt is worlds colliding, and this is my interpretation.

Skyfall is where we start
A thousand miles and poles apart
Where worlds collide and days are dark

The first that came to my mind when I saw “worlds colliding” were these lines from Adele’s Skyfall. Which has nothing to do with The Daily Posts’ explanation of worlds colliding, which is why I didn’t include that explanation in this post.

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